How I fixed the lag issue on my Nexus 5x

If you Google Nexus 5x lag, you will see many users complaining about lag on the Nexus 5x. If you follow the threads, some people will complain about lag. Others will say they've experienced no lag. Some seem to think it has to do with faulty units (vs. non-faulty units). Others seem to think it has to do with not-yet-optimized-for-Marshmallow apps.

I, too, experienced the lag, but I chalked it up to Marshmallow still needing some kinks ironed out or the difference in performance between an encrypted Android vs. an unencrypted one. It also wasn't horribly debilitating a lag—it was just slightly annoying. It would be an extra second switching apps or an extra second for an app to load after being selected.

I tried uninstalling some apps I thought might be problematic. I also tried clearing the cache partition (that would make things a little better for maybe an hour or so, but then the lag would return).

Finally, I did what I really didn't want to do: I did a factory reset. I backed up all my data to my computer and did a full wipe of all my phone's contents. Now this, I think, is the most important step: when setting up the phone, I chose not to restore backed up data from Google's servers and just do a fresh, clean setup. It was annoying, of course, because I had to go through all my settings and tweak them and manually download all my apps again, but it was totally worth it. Now there's absolutely zero lag. The phone performs just as well as my old Moto X 2013.

I don't know that this is the definitive solution, but it worked for me. So if you're one of those Nexus 5x users who's experiencing the dreaded lag, take the 3-4 hours to back up your data locally, do a factory reset, do not restore backed-up data associated with your Google account, then re-download your apps, restore your local backup, and re-configure everything again fresh. You, too, may find it totally worth the trouble.

Nexus 5x: Second Impressions

Here's a follow-up to last week's Nexus 5x: First Impressions post.

What I've liked so far

Basically, it's all the same stuff that impressed me at first—mainly the camera and the fingerprint sensor.

What's bothered me so far

While this list may look long, it doesn't mean I'm not enjoying using the phone, but I do have some nitpicks, so here they are:

  1. Even though the double-tap on the power button launches up the camera no matter where you are (great!), you'd think (as it did on the Moto X after a double-twist) that the phone being already unlocked would return you to an unlocked state after you launch up the camera. Nope. Whether the phone was unlocked or not before you launch the camera with the power button double-tap, it will be relocked after you're done with the camera. Sure, you can unlock it again quickly using the fingerprint sensor, but in terms of usability and user expectations, there's no reason launching up the camera should change the phone from an unlocked state to a locked state.
  2. Google will prompt you to enable Google Now cards and Google Now on Tap. That's fine. That's what I expect them to do. But even after you click to enable them and then decide to disable them again, there will still be a prompt, when you hold the home button, to enable them. Advertise once, please. Once I've seen it, I don't need to see it again. I opted out. Don't bug me.
  3. If you plug your Nexus 5x in to a computer, it will always default to charging only and not to transferring files. There is no way to change this default. The behavior is even more bothersome if your main computer is a Mac, because Android File Transfer (the Mac program you have to use to transfer files to/from Android) will automatically launch up when a phone is plugged in, but since the phone isn't set to transfer files, Android File Transfer will think the phone is just locked and give you an error message, which means you have to temporarily (again, no way to permanently change this setting) set the phone to transfer files and then re-launch Android File Transfer.
  4. When you first set up the phone, it asks if you want to require a password every time the phone boots up. Two issues with this—if you select to require a password, there's no way to change it back without factory resetting your phone; and even if you select not to require the password, it will still require a password!
  5. Apps aren't all updated to work with Marshmallow yet. Not exactly the fault of the phone, but just something to keep in mind. I tried using Firefox with Adblock. and it would constantly cause the phone to reboot (Chrome and Opera operate just fine). VolumeNext doesn't work to skip forward with a regular auxiliary cable (not headphones) but can skip backwards—didn't have that issue with lollipop. Those are just two examples. There will probably be others for other users. After a while, the app developers will update their apps to be more compatible with Marshmallow.
  6. The camera aspect ratio defaults to 4:3 instead of 16:9. The phone is advertised at having a 12 megapixel camera, but if you change it to 16:9, it drops to 8 megapixels. It may be fine to have 4:3 for Instagram, but when you look at your photos in the Photos app, there will be black bars (because the phone itself has closer to a 16:9 aspect ratio). I've changed it to 16:9, and it seems to be much better. I don't believe the drop in megapixels adversely affects the quality of the photos.

Do I still recommend this phone?

Hell, yes! As I mentioned before, those are tiny nitpicks people should be aware of, but the day-to-day use of the phone is great. Still a bit too large for my tastes, but there is no 4.3-inch screen on a new Nexus phone, so it's at least smaller than the 6p.

Unboxing the Nexus 5x

Useless Backstory: Moto X to Nexus 5x

My by far favorite Android phone since 2009 has been the Moto X 2013. Indeed, if it were not for its subpar camera, I would say it is, even now, still the best Android phone. The Moto X 2013 had innovative new features (ones that—had Apple released them in the iPhone—iPhone fans would be gushing about as evidence of Apple pushing new boundaries and being very user-centered in its design... since Motorola's marketing department isn't as good, most people just ignored these features): ambient display, double-twist to activate camera, OK Google Now, etc.

That said, I find myself using my phone's camera more and more often and being very sad about especially the low-light shots from the Moto X 2013. I've also found the fingerprint sensor on the new iOS devices to be pretty cool, and the reviews said the sensor on the Nexus 5x is even more responsive. I also find it a bit awkward to press my thumb on the home button of an iOS device to unlock it. I like the idea of the sensor being on the back of the phone where your index finger might naturally rest when picking up the phone.

More Useless Backstory: Fed Ex Annoyances

I was dumb and decided to have Google deliver to my apartment instead of my workplace. So Fed Ex attempted a delivery when I wasn't home, and then I tried to get it over the weekend and called Fed Ex, but the customer service representative, whom I could barely understand, said the facility was closed over the weekend, so I couldn't pick it up in person. Oddly, I couldn't redirect the destination either—something I'm pretty sure I've done in the past. When I did happen to be home the second time, the Fed Ex delivery person said, "This is the second time I've tried to deliver this," as if he were scolding me. Seriously? I'm supposed to be always home? What the...? I didn't say anything smarmy back to him, though, because I was excited to check out the new phone.

The Unboxing: Featuring my bad photography skills

Yes, I like having a good camera. No, I'm a terrible photographer. Most of these shots I took with a shaky hand using my old Moto X 2013. A few of the later ones I took using an iPad Mini.

2015-10-26 13.36.12 It comes in a very cute small square box.


2015-10-26 13.36.30 Once you get the cover off, the front of the box has a logo that's supposed to be an X, I suppose.

2015-10-26 13.36.43 You can open the box without scissors. It's taped down on only one side of the square.

2015-10-26 13.36.54 LG took a cue from IKEA and put in some cryptic wordless instructions. The phone itself comes in a translucent sleeve, which is really just for show (my Moto X 2013 came with a screen protector on it, which I used for two full years and never had to buy a third-party protector to replace it with).

Then, there's the USB-C cable and the charger.

2015-10-26 13.37.43 Beneath the phone is a playing card that tells you you get a 90-day trial for Google Play Music. There's also a small Safety + Warranty booklet.

The tiny, shiny circle with a pin at the end lets you pop up the SIM card holder from the phone. I was also able to use this same one to pop out the SIM card holder for my old Moto X 2013.

2015-10-26 13.38.12 Another random shot of the cable and charger.

2015-10-26 14.47.06 Here is the Nexus 5x next to my Moto X 2013. The Nexus 5x is enormous compared to my old phone, which I'm a bit sad about. I really wanted a new Nexus phone, and the Nexus 5x is smaller than the 6p, so I opted for the 5x, but it's still huge!

2015-10-26 14.47.24 I didn't do any actual measurements, but the phone thickness seems okay, It's more flat than curved but about the same thickness as the Moto X 2013.

2015-10-26 14.47.44
Another gratuitous "Why is this phone so big?!" shot.

I haven't had a ton of time to play around with the phone yet, but the camera seems good (I haven't tried it in low light yet, though), and the fingerprint sensor is indeed fast in terms of responsiveness.

Why I’m looking forward to the Google self-driving car

It's actually been a few years since I first saw a video of the Google self-driving car in action. A friend of mine from high school had the luxury of being in an early test vehicle (a Prius in a parking garage), and he posted it to Facebook with the caption Autobots... roll out!

It was amazing for me to see how the car could swerve and navigate sharp turns around cones flawlessly, driving over 50 miles per hour in a small parking structure.

Since then, Google has had self-driving prototypes logging miles and only one accident... when the car was in manual override instead of automated mode.

Recently, The Oatmeal had a short blog post on the Google self-driving car. Its author seemed excited about the possibilities, though there are things to be worked out:

Despite the advantages over a human being in certain scenarios, however, these cars still aren't ready for the real world. They can't drive in the snow or heavy rain, and there's a variety of complex situations they do not process well, such as passing through a construction zone. Google is hoping with enough logged miles and data, eventually the cars will be able to handle all of this as well (or better) than a human could.

I have to say, as I've gotten older and have begun to view driving as more of a chore than an exciting adventure, the self-driving cars (Google or otherwise) cannot come soon enough.

When I was younger, I almost got into a couple of accidents, because I was too tired to drive. I would blast loud music, punch myself in the stomach, roll down my window in freezing winter temperatures in (sometimes vain) attempts to keep myself awake. Sometimes I'd pull over to rest. One time I actually fell asleep on the highway and woke up two lanes over (luckily, I didn't hit any other cars, and I didn't hit the guard rail, either—pure adrenaline alone kept me awake for the rest of the drive).

Even as I got older, my stamina in keeping awake got better, but I would often have to forsake a drink in order to be the designated driver. My wife and I have been out to dinner many times and have had to negotiate the "Do you want to get a glass of wine? It's okay if you do... I'll drive" dance.

How nice would it be to just tell your Google self-driving car "I've had too much to drink. Take me home." or "I'm feeling tired. Can you drive me home?" Or just have the opportunity to eat or text or do whatever in the car, while the car gets you home?

Now, I know some people are suspicious about automating things. After all, if all cars are controlled by a computer, isn't Skynet just a few years away? Could be. But that ship has already sailed. Cars are already computer controlled. And there have already been some out-of-driver-control accidents that have resulted in recalls (I'm thinking, for example, of the accidental acceleration of Priuses a few years back). At least in early prototypes, Google has included a manual override option.

That said, I predict that there will be at least one catastrophic failure of the self-driving car that will result in hundreds, if not thousands of deaths. It's a little but of the trolley problem. Each of those deaths will be tragic, but they won't compare to the 30,000+ motor vehicle deaths that happen every year in the U.S. since 1946.

My biggest gripe with a self-driving car will be the navigation! One time, Google Maps took me and my wife to a random street in Redondo Beach, when we were trying to go to the Getty Malibu. Another time, we tried to have Google Maps take us to White Castle, and we ended up at some random house in a suburban street. I'm hoping that as the self-driving aspect improves, so will the general Google Maps navigation... at least for getting home.

Memo from 2008: Chrome stores passwords in plain text (*gasp*)

Just when I thought shoddy tech "journalism" couldn't stoop any lower, there is now a supposedly "new" report out that Chrome stores its passwords in plain text.

From Google Chrome security flaw offers unrestricted password access at The Guardian:

A serious flaw in the security of Google's Chrome browser lets anyone with access to a user's computer see all the passwords stored for email, social media and other sites, directly from the settings panel. No password is needed to view them.

Absolutely no mention that this has been known for years. Why this is being reported now, I have no idea.

From Google Chrome flaw exposes user passwords at The Telegraph:

Software developer Elliott Kember stumbled across the vulnerability when importing his bookmarks from Apple's Safari browser to Google Chrome. He discovered that it was mandatory to import saved passwords from one browser to the other – something he described as 'odd'.

After doing a bit more digging, he found that Google does not protect passwords from being viewed when a user is logged in and running Chrome. Anyone with access to the computer can view stored passwords by going to the advanced settings page and clicking on the “Passwords and forms” option, followed by “Manage saved passwords”.

Here the reporter goes a step further to make it sound as if this is some new discovery.

This is not a new discovery. Many people, including the developers at Google, know about this, and have known about this for years. It's a deliberate (albeit bad) design choice. I knew about it in 2009, and I've known about it ever since.

Someone back in December 2008 already reported it to Google:

Google, Why does your browser Chrome not have a master password for saved passwords? This is ridiculous

and Google's response:

Hi everybody,

We understand that many of you want a master password for your saved passwords in Google Chrome. You’ve laid out many scenarios in which this might be useful, but the most common is that if your computer were to fall into the wrong hands, that person would then have access to your saved passwords.

While we agree that this situation would be terrible, we believe that a master password would not sufficiently protect you from danger. Someone with physical access to your computer could install a keylogger to steal your passwords or go to the sites where your passwords are stored and get them from the automatically filled-in password fields. A master password required to show saved passwords would not prevent these outcomes.

Currently, the best method for protecting your saved passwords is to lock your computer whenever you step away from it, even for a short period of time. We encrypt your saved passwords on your hard disk. To access these passwords, someone would either need to log in as you or circumvent the encryption.

We know this is a long-standing issue, and we see where you're coming from. Please know that your security is our highest priority, and our decision not to implement the master password feature is base

Okay. It took Google almost a year to make that official response, but that's still almost three years ago!

I thought the "There are millions of Android malware apps (which no one is actually installing)" scare headlines were bad enough. Now known bugs that are deliberate design choices are suddenly newly-discovered security flaws. I can't palm forehead this enough...

If you want to store passwords with a master password, use Firefox. The master password encrypts your saved passwords. It's not a perfect solution, but it's better than what Chrome's doing... and has been doing for years.